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Behind the lens with Notre Dame Photographer Matt Cashore

On the move.

Follow in the footsteps of Senior Notre Dame Photographer Matt Cashore for just a minute and you’ll realize that ”luck” is the result of years of outhustling and decades of outthinking his opponents.

“I’ve been photographing Notre Dame long enough where I can separate myself as an alumna and fan as a photographer.”

Cashore has been part of the university for nearly three decades.

First as a student now as a Senior Photographer.

“The first Notre Dame game I ever photographed was Notre vs. Air force in October of 1990. It was overwhelming at first. It was like jumping on a treadmill that was going 100 miles an hour,” said Cashore.

“Highlights would be the 1993 Florida State game where they beat Florida State and became #1, 2005 USC the bush push, anytime they beat Michigan is memorable. So I’ve seen Lou Holtz, Bob Davie, Tyrone Willingham, Charlie Weiss and now Brian Kelly. And everyone of those coaches has had a different personality and challenge to make a good picture of,” said Cashore.

But what about the perfect shot?

“A perfect shot will resonate with people. A key play in a key game. It will have some sort of atmospheric or lighting element to it, it will be technically sharp and all of those things. But the combo of those three coming together at the same time is harder to do than it looks. I have not shot the perfect shot yet but I have shot some very nice pictures over the years fortunately,” said Cashore.

And not just on the football field.

Cashore travels with the university all over the globe visiting as many as 20 countries and recently taking a trip to china.

“I like to say sometimes I am shooting pictures for the university archives 75 years from now. The work of nd on and off the football field. Notre Dame’s leadership and efforts in larger society. I hope there is a good record visually years into the future, when its Notre Dame’s 250th anniversary that I will have contributed heavily with the work I am doing today,” said Cashore.

Capturing moments in time and exposing the world to the raw emotion at Notre Dame.

A realization of a dream which was born long ago.

“There are times I realize this is exactly what my goal was as a student to be doing what I’m doing for a living and I feel fortunate,” said Cashore.

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